The Must-Visit House Museum in London

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The Must-Visit House Museum in London

House Museum in London

A Must-Visit Home Museum in London – Historic house museums are a rare and precious entity in many cities, whose cultural and architectural landscapes are constantly being renewed, often erasing the past. London, however, is fortunate enough to have some amazing house museums, notable for the history of the space as well as what was inside.

This list reveals the top five ‘memory museums’ open to the public in London. They all offer their visitors a fascinating insight into this historic city, as well as the famous life that helped shape it.

Sir John Soane Museum

Even before he died in 1833, the eminent Neoclassical architect Sir John Soane RA (1753-1837) had established his house – which he designed himself – as a museum, with an Act of Parliament requiring the preservation of the house ‘as close to the state as possible’. in the state where it was found at the time the designer and occupant died.

Soane’s high commitment demands can be explained by the treasured presence in his home of a carefully arranged collection, a treasure trove of art and true antiques. Both past and present, students of art and architecture can benefit greatly from the combined assets of the Sir John Soane Museum: stunning home designs, the collection of Soane’s collections and new temporary exhibitions that complement existing collections.

Leighton House Museum

One of the interesting aspects of the so-called ‘memory museum’ in general, and the former home of the Victorian painter Frederic, Lord Leighton in particular, is the high level of care and innovation to preserve the historic home. Today’s Leighton House Museum provides a superb insight into the artist’s eminent studios, created as his “private palaces of art.” The centerpiece, the magnificent Arab Hall, stands as a distinctive example of Victorian Orientalism, the era’s obsession with the exotic East.

However, the preserved beauty of the place must be owed to those who have worked hard since Leighton’s death and the subsequent auction of his entire collection: first the Association started building a new collection of Leighton’s own works (now on display in the Museum), and now a winning two-year refurbishment project. the award was completed in 2012, which returned the stately residence to its former splendor.

red house

The Red House (completed 1859 by William Morris and Philip Webb), so called for its bright red brick coloring, stands as an archetypal specimen of the Arts and Crafts social and cultural movement in the decorative arts and fine arts. It was famously described by Pre-Raphaelite artist and designer Sir Edward Burne-Jones as ‘the most beautiful place on earth.’

Now, it’s not hard to see why: the buildings, gardens, and interiors that serve as the William Morris family home are filled with the fine craftsmanship and uniquely captivating details that have made the Arts and Crafts movement in the decorative arts and fine arts popular. inheritance. From the buildings’ quasi-Gothic architecture to the now iconic wallpapers and murals that adorn the walls of the House, the Red House is a true masterpiece of traditional non-mechanical craftsmanship.

Dr’s house Johnson

In a slightly different vein from the aesthetically appealing historic home of London architects, designers and painters, the Dr. House. Johnson instead provides an interesting view of the private residence of the man who single-handedly provided England with the first comprehensive modern English dictionary.

Hidden, yet easy to stumble right in the center of London, this modest townhouse, built in the 1700s and lived by Johnson between 1748-1759, has been open to the public since 1914 for those who wish to learn more about the life and work of the fascinating individual. The library, of course, is a highlight, containing the first edition of Dr. Rare Johnson.

Dr's house Johnson

2 Willow Road

The final house on this list, designed and lived in by modernist architect Erno Goldfinger (whose name is rumored to be the basis for notorious Bond villain Ian Fleming due to the novelist’s opposition to the Goldfinger project, which involved demolishing several cottages) is also the newest, but no less historically interesting for it. .

There are many and varied reasons to stop by and visit: 2 Willow Road is one of the few Modernist homes in England open to the public, and inside you can find new contemporary exhibits, informative guides to the fascinating life of their owners, and an impressive collection of modern art. greats include works by Marcel Duchamp, Henry Moore, Bridget Riley and Max Ernst.